Museum celebrates 75th anniversary tonight

Rawlins Daily Times, Trudy Balcom The staff at Carbon County Museum was busy Tuesday afternoon putting the finishing touches on an expanded exhibit about Big Nose George. The crew hung a photo mural showing Rawlins’ Front Street during the time period when George was hung from a light post there.From the left: Corrine Gordon, registrar; Karen Larsen, visitor services assistant; Kelly Bohanan, museum director and Lauren Hunley, education coordinator.

Rawlins Daily Times, Trudy Balcom
The staff at Carbon County Museum was busy Tuesday afternoon putting the finishing touches on an expanded exhibit about Big Nose George. The crew hung a photo mural showing Rawlins’ Front Street during the time period when George was hung from a light post there.From the left: Corrine Gordon, registrar; Karen Larsen, visitor services assistant; Kelly Bohanan, museum director and Lauren Hunley, education coordinator.

By Trudy Balcom

tbalcom@rawlinstimes.com

RAWLINS — If you don’t know what’s for dinner tonight, don’t worry. You’ve got a party to go to.

The Carbon County Museum will be hosting its 75th Anniversary Celebration starting at 7:30 p.m. tonight, with a party that promises to be a fun community get-together.

“We’re calling it a cookout,” said Director Kelly Bohanan.

Food will be available on the museum grounds, along with live music.

“It’s also a chance for people to visit the museum in the evening,” Bohanan said.

The museum will be open with two recently expanded exhibits on Big Nose George and pioneer doctors in Carbon County. There is also a new children’s paleontology exhibit outdoors on the museum grounds.

Bring a blanket and some lawn chairs to make a night of it. An outdoor screening of “Grease,” will be shown at dusk.

“I’m 98 percent sure it will be a sing-along,” Bohanan said.

The Carbon County Museum was started in 1940 with a single exhibit that was housed in the Carbon County Courthouse.

“The Rev. Hugh Fulton made arrangements for the museum with the county board,” Bohanan said. “Then people just started donating things.”

Bohanan said that a group of local ladies ran the museum as volunteers.

“The ladies running the museum — they liked to play cards. If they were in the middle of a game and someone wanted to visit the museum, they would give to key to an 11 year-old boy named Rans Baker, and he would open the museum,” Bohanan said.

Baker remained active at the museum throughout his life.

The museum remained at the courthouse until they moved to their current location at 904 Walnut St., in a former Mormon church building in 1976.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *